PatrickMD.net

Thoughts on Medicine, Anesthesiology, and Software

PatrickMD.net header image 2

Why I Didn’t Switch to Movable Type

June 20th, 2008 by Patrick

After getting a great web hosting deal, I decided to set up this domain “patrickmd.net” for various small software projects.  I migrated the posts from my old and mostly ignored blog “medwreck” to my self-hosted WordPress installation here.  Moving the old posts was trivial using the import/export feature.

Wordpress Logo

However, before setting up a self-hosted WordPress instance, I decided to look at other open source blog platforms, specifically Movable Type.  I had heard great things about MT, and it was very easy to install.
There are several blog posts comparing the two; some detailing the recent flamewar between the authors, some focusing on WordPress’s security problems, some claiming that WordPress security is actually great. One “smackdown” closely awarded the title to WordPress for the many plugins available, such as Akismet comment filtering.

Powered by Movable Type 4

In the end, I wasn’t able to fairly compare the two since my webhost supports mod_php, but not mod_perl or FastCGI.  Even using the most recent Movable Type (4.2rc2), the page latency was visible compared to WordPress.  Without some sort of server persistence there was no way I could get Movable Type to perform properly.

So, I’m on WordPress for the duration.  Thanks to helpful advice from Matt Cutts and others, I have a pretty tight security profile, at least until the next update is announced.

Tags:   · · · · 1 Comment

Leave a Comment

1 response so far ↓

  • Welcome to WordPress. :D

    You know that a lot of publicity around the security issues are mostly buzz and babble, not fact. Recently, a big security issue came up that had more to do with Google and poorly setup sites than WordPress, and hit plenty of non-WordPress sites, but WordPress got the blame. It’s a growing concern, but keep things updated, as you would on your computer normally, and you should have little problems on the security end.

    I’m glad that Movable Type has finally matured and improved to really compete with WordPress and other services. Everyone needs a little competition to stir things up and make all the products better.

    Either way, whatever platform you use, it’s not about the code underneath but the visible presence you create on the web. Put your energy there and do work that makes you happy and the rest is just details. Good luck!